The George Washington University: Student Athletes

COLONIALS NUTRITION

The Strength & Conditioning staff at the George Washington University collaborates with dieticians, grocery stores, local companies, and professionals in the field to educate and guide our athletes on nutrition and supplement use.

Be sure to stay involved and connected by following our Colonial Nutrition blog and @colonialfitfood Twitter handle.

COLONIALS NUTRITION STATIONS
We are proud to introduce three new nutrition stations to fuel up our athletes, providing them with NCAA compliant nutritional supplements, fruits, and smoothies.

Nutrition Station Location & Schedule
Monday - Friday
LOCATION NUTRITION STATION HOURS*
North Concession Stand 7 - 11 am, 3 - 7 pm
Smith Center Weight Room 6 am - 9 pm
Mount Vernon 6 am - 6:30 pm

* - Please note that hours are subject to change

COLONIALS NUTRITION SUPPLEMENTS

At GW we do our best to make nutrition smart, convenient and easy for our athletes. Check out our supplemental nutrition menu.

Pre-Workout Snack
Optimize your performance; make sure you consume adequate food. It is important to get fuel in 15-60 minutes prior to workouts.

-Honey stinger Energy Bars, Gels, Waffles, and Chews honey_stinger



-Muscle Milk Bars muscle_milk_bars



-Cytomax Energy Drops Performance Drink cytomax_drops



Post-Workout Snack
Consume immediately (within 30 minutes) after a workout

-Muscle Milk Collegiate Bars, Powder, and Shakes muscle_milk_collegiate



-Crons Come Ready Protein bars come_ready_bars



-Honey stinger Protein Bars honey_stinger



Vitamins and Minerals
One-A-Day Men's and Woman's Vitamins can ensure our athletes get vitamins and minerals for the day. Add a scoop of Cytomax Performance Drink to your water to help you replenish electrolytes.

-Cytomax Performance Drink cytomax_drink



-One-A-Day Multivitamins one_a_day



General Nutritional Breakdown of Supplements
SUPPLEMENT SERVING CALORIES CARBOHYDRATES PROTEIN FAT
Honey Stinger Energy Chews 1 package 160 39 g 1 g 0 g
Honey Stinger Waffle 1 package 160 21 g 0 g 7 g
Honey Stinger Energy Gel 1 package
Honey Stinger Energy Bars 1 bar 180 28 g 10 g 3 g
Honey Stinger 10g Protein Bar 1 bar 190 18 g 10 g 10 g
Honey Stinger 20g Protein Bar 1 bar 390 36 g 20 g 20 g
Muscle Milk Collegiate Ready-to-Drink Shakes 1 drink 250 28 g 18 g 7 g
Muscle Milk Collegiate Powder 1 scoop 145 22.5 g 10 g 1.75 g
Muscle Milk Protein Bars 1 bar 150 17 g 11 g 6 g
Crons Come Ready Bar 1 bar 320 38 g 24 g 7 g
Cytomax Performance Drink 1 scoop 90 22 g 0 g 0 g
Cytomax Energy Drops 1 package 90 22 g 0 g 0 g

REITERATION OF REAL FOOD

As an Athletics Department we strive to provide the most effective and efficient options for our athletes. However, we want to make sure our athletes are informed of the importance of real food! Please use supplements as they are intended, as supplements and continue to eat nutrient-dense meals.

NUTRITION AND SUPPLEMENTS IN THE NCAA

Visit NCAA.org for information on NCAA Banned Substances.

For information on Nutrition and Supplement bylaws please read below:

NCAA Division I Bylaw 16.5.2 - (g) and NCAA Division II Bylaw 16.5.1 - (h) - Nutritional Supplements (I/II)
Date Published: September 12, 2006
Item Ref: 1
Educational Column:

Is your School Compliant or Complicit? The compliance coordinator's role in reducing the risks associated with the use of nutritional supplements.

Each and every year, the NCAA Committee on Competitive Safeguards and Medical Aspects of Sports (CSMAS), hears appeals of positive drug tests by student-athletes who claim they only used dietary supplement products they obtained legally, at local retailers, at the gym, or over the Internet and that they checked out the ingredients against the NCAA list of banned substances before using the product. The tragedy of these claims is that some of them are likely true. The outcomes of studies conducted by the University of California, Los Angeles Olympic Lab and reported in the Washington Post in October 2005 identified supplements that contain banned ingredients that are not listed on the product label, illustrating the risk involved in using products from an industry that does not need to prove purity, efficacy or safety before putting products on the market. In fact, it is only after extensive reporting and investigation that any problematic dietary supplement is pulled off the shelves by the Federal Drug Administration, following years of reports of adverse effect to consumers in this "buyer beware" market. This was clearly illustrated in the case for ephedra, which is banned by the NCAA and other sports organizations, but until two years ago was available in over-the-counter dietary supplement products. (Its chemical cousin, ephedrine, is still available over the counter, and still banned.)

The bottom line for the supplement industry is its bottom line, not the health or eligibility of NCAA student-athletes. The bottom line for NCAA student-athletes is that a positive drug test resulting from using a supplement product that contains an NCAA banned substance sends the user out of NCAA sports participation for one year, most never to return.

Because of concerns for student-athletes' health and safety, and a commitment to maintain fair and equitable competition, the NCAA restricts the kinds of nutritional supplements member schools may provide to student-athletes, per NCAA Division I Bylaw 16.5.2-(g), and bans the use of performance enhancing substances by student-athletes per Division I Bylaw 31.2.3.

Seems a simple task? Unfortunately, the billion dollar supplement industry pulls out all the stops to convince student-athletes and those who work with them that not only will they be better athletes by using sports performance supplement products, but that by not using these products, as one supplement promoter put it, . . "means you are not serious about reaching your potential. . . ", or as another posted on their Web site, these products are for collegiate student-athletes who "aspire to maximize his or her college experience and become world class student-athletes." Athletics departments become complicit in the use of performance enhancing supplements by encouraging student-athletes to obtain supplements on their own (or purposefully not discouraging use), or by providing supplement products that are marketed for performance enhancement. In doing so, they promote a culture that sets expectations and drives behavior of our student-athletes, many who will feel compelled to try anything in order to improve his or her performance.

Division I Bylaw 16.5.2-(g), provides that only nonmuscle-building nutritional supplements may be given to student-athletes for the purpose of providing additional calories and electrolytes, as long as the supplements do not contain any NCAA banned substances.

The Pacific-10 Conference first introduced this legislation in 1999 to address concerns about the growing distribution by athletics departments of nutritional supplements that could be considered performance-enhancing and potentially harmful to student-athlete's health and safety. The (CSMAS) recommended language to identify as permissible only those nutritional supplements that fall into one of four categories: Carbohydrate/electrolyte drinks, energy bars, carbohydrate boosters, and vitamins and minerals. Those permissible categories were selected because they provide for hydration and calorie replacement only; they do not create a competitive advantage through strength/muscle building. The vitamins and minerals category was created because of the general acceptance by the public and the widespread inclusion in foods.

The clear intent of the nutritional supplement legislation is to allow institutions to meet the needs of student-athletes to replace calories and fluids expended in large amounts during training and competition. By limiting distribution of supplements, the legislation intended to root out those that could be deemed to provide an unfair advantage or potentially be harmful to health. A more complete reading of the application of this legislation, originally published in The NCAA News, May 23, 2005, can be found at www.ncaa.org/health-safety, under the "Education and Wellness" link. So what is the role of the compliance administrator on this issue? To assist the membership in accurately applying Division I Bylaw 16.5.2-(g), compliance administrators are charged with assuring that both the letter and the intent of the legislation is met. If an institution is considering the purchase of a supplement product, first ask: For what purpose is this product being provided? If staff intend to provide this product to student-athletes for performance gains, then this product goes against the legislative intent.

Secondly ask: Does this product meet the criteria of the legislation, [i.e., can it legitimately be classified as a carbohydrate booster (no more than 30 percent of calories from protein)], a fluid/electrolyte replacement drink or a standard vitamin/mineral? If the product makes claims beyond replacing carbohydrates and fluids, then the product goes against both the intent and the letter of the legislation.

And finally, if the product's list of ingredients contain strange and exotic blends and ingredients that make claims regarding health and performance, this product has placed itself outside the realm of accuracy, safety and legitimacy, and should not be provided to student-athletes. Remember, the intent of the supplement manufacturers is to sell product, not protect a student-athlete's health and safety.

It is the role of all athletics staff to protect the health of and provide a safe environment for all NCAA student-athletes, and to guard the integrity of the game. And as one compliance administrator put it: "Compliance Administrators usually are the first and last lines of defense. . . the ones who have to ask the questions no one wants to ask."

NCAA staff contact: Mary Wilfert, associate director, health and safety mwilfert@ncaa.org
[References: Division I Bylaws 16.5.2-(g) (nutritional supplements) and 31.2.3 (ineligibility for use of banned drugs; Division II Bylaw 16.5.1-(h) (nutritional supplements)]


NCAA Bylaw 16.5.2-(g) - Nutritional Supplements
Date Published: May 23, 2005
Item Ref: 2
Educational Column:

NCAA Division I institutions should note that NCAA Bylaw 16.5.2-(g) (nutritional supplements) indicates that an institution may provide only nonmuscle-building nutritional supplements to a student-athlete at any time for the purpose of providing additional calories and electrolytes, provided the supplements do not contain any NCAA banned substances. Permissible nonmuscle-building nutritional supplements are identified according to the following classes: Carbohydrate/electrolyte drinks, energy bars, carbohydrate boosters and vitamins and minerals. Pursuant to a July 26, 2000, official interpretation, it is not permissible for an institution to provide any nutritional supplement/ingredients to its student-athletes, unless the supplement/ingredient is a nonmuscle-building supplement and is included in one of the four classes identified specifically in Bylaw 16.5.2-(g). The following information is an updated list of examples of permissible and nonpermissible nutritional supplements/ingredients as developed by the NCAA Competitive Safeguards and Medical Aspects of Sports Committee (CSMAS). The list below is not exhaustive but should assist institutions in determining the types of nutritional supplements/ingredients that may be provided to student-athletes.

Permissible
Vitamins and minerals
Energy bars
Calorie replacement drinks (e.g., Ensure, Boost)
Electrolyte replacement drinks (e.g., Gatorade, Powerade)

Nonpermissible
Amino Acids (including amino acid chelates)
Chondroitin*
Chrysin
CLA (Conjugated Linoleic Acid)
Creatine/creatine-containing compounds
Garcinia Cambogia (Hydroxycitric Acid)
Ginkgo Biloba
Ginseng
Glucosamine*
Glycerol **
Green Tea
HMB
Carnitine
Melatonin
MSM (Methylsulfonyl Methane)
Protein powders
Tribulus
Yohimbe

* It is permissible for an institution to provide Glucosamine and/or Chondroitin to a student-athlete for medical purposes, provided such substances are provided by a licensed medical doctor to treat a specific, diagnosed medical condition (as opposed to prescribing them for preventive reasons).
** Glycerine or glycerol as a binding ingredient in a supplement product is permissible.

A supplement that contains protein may be classified as a nonmuscle-building supplement provided it is included in one of the four permissible categories, does not contain more than 30 percent of its calories from protein (based solely on the package label) and does not contain additional ingredients that are designed to assist in the muscle-building process (see examples of nonpermissible supplements/ingredients). Nutritional supplements containing more than 30 percent of its calories from protein are classified as muscle-building supplements and may not be provided to student-athletes.

One gram of protein equals four calories. Therefore, the percentage of calories from protein contained in a nutritional supplement may be calculated by multiplying the number of grams of protein per serving by four and dividing the product by the total number of calories per serving. For example, a nutritional supplement that contains 120 total calories per serving and nine grams of protein per serving would contain 36 calories from protein (i.e., 9 grams x 4). Therefore, the percentage of calories from protein would be 0.3 or 30 percent (i.e., 36 calories from protein/120 total calories).

Institutions should note that if a supplement product includes any impermissible ingredient, it is not permissible to provide such a supplement to student-athletes. Further, when considering the product's protein content, institutions should consider the listing of the word "protein" and the number of grams included. If any other parts of a protein are listed separately, as in any amino acid or chain, it would not be permissible for an institution to provide such a supplement to its student-athletes. If the product lists a "proprietary protein" or "protein blend," then this is not protein from a whole food source, but rather a concoction created by the manufacturer, and in most instances includes impermissible supplement ingredients.

Finally, in order to assist the membership in applying the legislation, the following steps are recommended.
In considering whether a supplement product is permissible under the legislation, a member institution should:
• Review the label and ingredients to determine if the product meets one of the permissible classes of supplements (e.g., carbohydrate/electrolyte drinks, energy bars, carbohydrate boosters and vitamins and minerals);
• Review the ingredients for any banned substances (see www.ncaa.org/health-safety);
• Determine whether or not the product contains any of the examples of "impermissible" ingredients referenced earlier; and
• Determine if the product contains more than 30 percent calories from protein.

If still unsure whether or not a particular supplement is permissible, the institution should contact NCAA membership services for interpretive assistance and should provide full written product ingredient information. Membership services will act in concert with sports medicine consultants to provide a review of the product and response back to the member institution. Products deemed permissible should be reviewed annually to determine if any reformulation of the product has introduced elements that make it no longer permissible to provide to student-athletes. If an institution has an interest in providing a supplement product being offered by a manufacturer or distributor of the product, it is the institution's responsibility to follow the outlined steps. An institution should not refer the manufacturer or distributor to the NCAA for a product review.


2003 Column No. 8 - Bylaw 16.5.2 - (g) Nutritional Supplements (I)
Date Published: April 14, 2003
Item Ref: 2003 Column No. 8
Educational Column:

Division I institutions should note that during its July 26, 2000, meeting, the NCAA Division I Academic/Eligibility/Compliance Cabinet Subcommittee on Legislative Review and Interpretations agreed that it is not permissible for an institution to provide any nutritional supplement/ingredients to its student-athletes, unless the supplement/ingredient is a nonmuscle-building supplement and is included in one of the four classes identified specifically in Bylaw 16.5.2-(g) (i.e., carbohydrate/electrolyte drinks, energy bars, carbohydrate boosters, and vitamins and minerals). The following is a list of examples of permissible and nonpermissible nutritional supplements/ingredients as developed by the NCAA Competitive Safeguards and Medical Aspects of Sports Committee (CSMAS). The list below is not exhaustive but should assist institutions in determining the types of nutritional supplements/ingredients that may be provided to student-athletes.

Permissible
Vitamins and Minerals
Energy bars
Calorie replacement drinks (e.g., Ensure, Boost)
Electrolyte replacement drinks (e.g., Gatorade, Powerade)

Nonpermissible Amino Acids
Chrysin
Condroitin
Creatine/creatine-containing compounds
Ginseng
Glucosamine
Glycerol
HMB
I-carnitin
Melatonin
Pos-2
Protein powders
Tribulus

The subcommittee, at the recommendation of the CSMAS, also determined that a supplement that contains protein may be classified as a nonmuscle-building supplement provided it is included in one of the four permissible categories, does not contain more than 30 percent of its calories from protein (based solely on the package label) and does not contain additional ingredients that are designed to assist in the muscle-building process (see examples of nonpermissible supplements/ingredients). Nutritional supplements containing more than 30 percent of its calories from protein are classified as muscle-building supplements and may not be provided to student-athletes.

To assist the membership in calculating the percentage of calories from protein contained in a particular supplement, the subcommittee noted that one gram of protein equals four calories. Therefore, the percentage of calories from protein contained in a nutritional supplement may be calculated by multiplying the number of grams of protein per serving by four and dividing the product by the total number of calories per serving. For example, a nutritional supplement that contains 120 total calories per serving and nine grams of protein per serving would contain 36 calories from protein (i.e., 9 grams x 4). Therefore, the percentage of calories from protein would be 0.3 or 30 percent (i.e., 36 calories from protein/120 total calories).


2000 Column No. 22 -- NCAA Bylaw 16.5.2.2 -- Nutritional Supplements
Date Published: November 6, 2000
Item Ref: Column 22 #2
Educational Column:

Division I institutions should note that pursuant to an official interpretation (reference: 07/26/00, Item a), glucosamine and condroitin are muscle-building nutritional supplements that institutions are not permitted to provide to student-athletes. However, please note that the Subcommittee on Legislative Review/Interpretations determined during its September 6 in-person meeting that it is permissible for institutions to provide glucosamine and condroitin to a student-athlete for medical purposes, provided such substances are prescribed by a licensed medical doctor (as opposed to a trainer) to treat a specific, diagnosed medical condition (as opposed to prescribing them for preventative reasons) and are necessary to enable the student-athlete to participate in intercollegiate athletics.


2000 Column No. 16 -- Bylaw 16.5.2.2 (Proposal 99-72) Nutritional Supplements
Date Published: August 14, 2000
Item Ref: Column 16 #1
Educational Column:

Division I institutions should note that pursuant to NCAA Bylaw 16.5.2.2 (Proposal 99-72), which became effective August 1, 2000, institutions may provide only nonmuscle-building nutritional supplements for the purpose of providing additional calories and electrolytes, provided they do not contain any NCAA-banned substances. Please note that an error occurred in the printing of the 2000-01 Manual relating to the new 16.5.2.2. The second sentence should read as follows: "Permissible nonmuscle-building nutritional supplements are identified according to the following classes: carbohydrate/electrolyte drinks, energy bars, carbohydrate boosters and vitamins and minerals." In adopting Proposal 99-72, the NCAA Division I Board of Directors noted a lack of long-term studies on the possible side effects of muscle-building supplements and agreed that muscle-building supplements are performance enhancing and provide a competitive advantage to those institutions that can afford to provide these supplements to their student-athletes.

During its July 26 telephone conference, the Division I Academics/Eligibility/Compliance Cabinet Subcommittee on Legislative Review/Interpretations determined that it is not permissible for an institution to provide nutritional supplements to its student-athletes, unless the supplement is a nonmuscle-building supplement and is included in one of the four classes identified in Bylaw 16.5.2.2. Additionally, institutions should note that during its June 28 telephone conference, the subcommittee determined that it is not permissible for an institution or an institutional staff member to sell or arrange the sale of muscle-building supplements to student-athletes, inasmuch as this practice would be contrary to the rationale for the adoption of Proposal 99-72.

Further, during the June 11 meeting of the NCAA Competitive Safeguards and Medical Aspects of Sports Committee, the committee developed a list of nutritional supplements/ingredients identified as permissible and nonpermissible under Bylaw 16.5.2.2. The committee considered input provided to it by relevant outside organizations. The legislation reflects a philosophy that proper nutrition based on scientific principles is one of the tenets to optimal performance. The following lists are not exhaustive but should be used as a guide to understanding the application of the legislation. Please note the example calorie calculations as they relate to the permissibility of energy bars.

Permissible
Vitamins and minerals
Energy bars
Calorie replacement drinks (e.g. Ensure, Boost)
Electrolyte replacement drinks (e.g. Gatorade, Powerade)

Nonpermissible
Amino acids
Chrysin
Condroitin
Creatine/creatine containing compounds
Ginseng
Glucosamine
Glycerol
HMB
I-carnitin
Melatonin
Pos-2
Protein powders
Tribulus

Also during the July 26 telephone conference, the subcommittee, at the recommendation of the NCAA Competitive Safeguards and Medical Aspects of Sports Committee determined that a supplement that contains protein may be classified as a nonmuscle-building supplement, provided it meets all of the following conditions:
1. It is included in one of the four permissible categories set forth in 16.5.2.2;
2. It does not contain more than 30 percent of calories from protein (based solely on the package label); and
3. It does not contain additional ingredients that are designed to assist in the muscle-building process (see examples of nonpermissible supplements).

To assist the membership in calculating the percentage of calories from protein contained in a particular supplement, please note that one gram of protein equals four calories. Therefore, the percentage of calories from protein contained in a nutritional supplement may be calculated by multiplying the number of grams of protein per serving by four and dividing the product by the total number of calories per serving. The following are examples of this calculation:

Examples:
1. Energy bar contains 24 grams of protein with a caloric value of 250.
24 grams x 4 = 96 calories
96/250 = .384
Percentage of protein = 38% as an example, this energy bar would not be permissible.

2. Energy bar contains 17 grams of protein with a caloric value of 250.
17 grams x 4 = 68 calories
68/250 = .272
Percentage of protein = 27% as an example, this energy bar would be permissible.

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